For the Sox, Rotation Uncertainty Lingers

Posted on May 19 2016 - 10:15am by Greg Gisolfi

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I’m so damn tired of talking about the crappy Red Sox rotation.

But here I am again, talking about the crappy Red Sox rotation.

David Price has looked like his Cy Young winning self in his last two starts, including his two run outing against the Royals last night, so that’s encouraging for sure.

Steven Wright has been awesome. He reminds me of John Lackey in 2013. He’s been the team’s most consistent pitcher, but the Sox bats simply don’t score enough runs for him to win when he pitches.

Rick Porcello has had one or two clunkers, but honestly, I’ll take it. He’s far and away better than he was last year, and if his ERA sits around 3.5 or 4, that’s fine. That’s the type of pitcher he is. He’s a fine number four or five starter. Not saying the offense should have to score a ton of runs when he pitches, but they’re certainly capable.

Clay Buchholz makes me cry bitter tears against the sands of time.

Who the hell is next in line?

Joe Kelly is apparently ready to come back and start ASAP.  That would be this Saturday at Fenway against Cleveland. That’s cool. Hopefully he doesn’t suck. In 8.2 innings pitched this year, Kelly has allowed nine runs on 14 hits. Not ideal, but I would absolutely prefer him over Henry Owens, who was borderline pathetic in terms of control in his limited action this season.

Unfortunately, it looks like Eduardo Rodriguez is going to be on the shelf for quite a while.  Forget about him coming to save the day. The Sox are on their own on this one. It’s also still too early to be worrying about trading for another pitcher. Sure, the Sox could make a play for someone like Julio Teheran of the Braves, or James Shields of the Padres, but why settle? If they wait until July, when teams really have a bead on whether or not they’re going to contend, the Red Sox, provided they remain in the thick of things, will be one of the more active buyers in baseball. That’s a fact.

The question is, can their starters stay out of their own ways until then?

 
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